contraception,mst,prévention

Permanent Birth Control for Women

Pages liées  Santé Contraception Bénins Sexualité

Forum gratuit
Sexologie/Sexualité

Forum gratuit Santé

En savoir plus: Chat en ligne
AVSC International
[ Home | About AVSC | Site index | Publications ] [ Version Française | Versión Español ]
[ Contraception || Pregnancy || Informed Choice || Infections and Diseases || Quality of Care || Emerging Issues ]

Permanent Birth Control
for Women

What is permanent birth control for a woman?
Why would a woman choose permanent birth control?
How long does the operation take?
How does the doctor reach the tubes?
Laparoscopy
Minilaparotomy (minilap)
After delivery (postpartum)
During a C-section
How are the tubes closed?
What can I expect after the operation?
Where can I go to get permanent birth control?
What can I do if I'm not ready for permanent birth control?
Things you should know about permanent birth control
Is permanent birth control the right method for me?

What is permanent birth control for a woman?

A tubal occlusion is a simple operation that closes the tubes between the ovaries and the uterus. This operation is sometimes called sterilization or "tube tying." When the tubes are closed, sperm cells from a man cannot reach the eggs in a woman's body.

When you have all the children you want, you can choose permanent birth control and enjoy your family and your sex life without fear of unwanted pregnancy.

Why would a woman choose permanent birth control?

  • She has all the children she ever wants to have.
  • She and her partner do not want to use other methods of birth control.
  • She wants to enjoy sex without fear of unwanted pregnancy.
  • Age or health problems might cause an unsafe pregnancy.
  • She wants to have more time and money for the children she havs.

How long does the operation take?

  • It takes 30 to 45 minutes.
  • There will be a few hours of rest before going home.
  • Most women do not need to stay in the hospital overnight.


How does the doctor reach the tubes?

There are several ways the doctor can reach the tubes. Here are the most common methods:

Laparoscopy
The laparoscope is a long, thin instrument that is put in the body through a very small cut right below the belly button. It lets the doctor see the tubes and close them. The cut is so small that it can be covered with a Band-aid.

Minilaparotomy (Minilap)
The doctor reaches and closes the tubes through a small cut in the lower part of the body, just above the pubic hair line.

After delivery
A woman can plan to have her tubes tied while she is in the hospital after her baby is born. At that time, the tubes are close to the skin. The doctor can reach the tubes by making a small cut right below the belly button.

During a C-section
A woman can plan to have her tubes tied during a cesarean section. Right after the baby is born, the doctor reaches and ties the tubes through the same opening used to deliver the baby.

How are the tubes closed?

There are several ways the doctor can close the tubes. Here are the most common methods:
  • Cutting and tying the tubes
  • Sealing the tubes with a special instrument
A woman should talk with her doctor to see which methods are best for her. The doctor should discuss all details of the operation.

What can I expect after the operation?

  • You may be sore for a few days.
  • You may need to take it easy for 3 or 4 days.
  • You should avoid heavy lifting for a week.
  • You can have sex about a week after the operation.

Where can I go to get permanent birth control?

Go to a family doctor or family planning clinic for information. They can suggest doctors with special training for tubal operations.

What can I do if I'm not ready for permanent birth control?

You can ask your partner to use a condom.

You can ask a doctor or family planning clinic about other contraceptive options.

Things you should know about permanent birth control

The tubal operation for a woman is a permanent method of birth control.

Permanent birth control is now the most used method of birth control in the world.

Permanent birth control for a man is called vasectomy. Vasectomy is easier and cheaper than the operation for a woman.

Birth control is a basic human right. You are free to choose the method that is best for you at each stage of your life.

Permanent birth control does not protect a woman from sexually transmitted infections, including AIDS. A woman who is at risk for these infections should ask her partner to use a condom every time they have sex, even after she has had her tubes tied.

After having her tubes tied, a woman should continue to visit the clinic for normal health services, such as Pap smears and breast exams.

Ask your doctor or family planning clinic for complete information before you sign papers for permanent birth control.

Is permanent birth control the right method for me?

There are a number of factors you should consider before deciding whether permanent birth control is right for you. These questions can help you determine whether permanent birth control might be an effective method for you.


[ Contraception || Pregnancy || Informed Choice || Infections and Diseases || Quality of Care || Emerging Issues ]
[ Home | About AVSC | Site index | Publications ] [ Version Française | Versión Español ]


©2000 AVSC International. Please complete our survey or send questions/comments to: info@avsc.org.

Accueil | Conditions générales | FAQ | Contact




Voyance
 Accueil
 Mon Menu Perso
 Rencontre
 Messagerie
 Chat
 Espace membre
 Expressions
 Forum
 Santé
 Mutuelles
 Contraception
 Bénins
 Grossesse
 IVG
 Stérilité
 MST
 Sida
 IAG
 Adresses
 Liens
 Sélection livres
 Forum santé
 Sexualité
 Mariage
 Astrologie
 Jeux
 Voyager
 Humour
 Editorial
13 connectés au chat
38 connectés au total
Consulter l'annonce
ajouter aux favoris Permanent Birth Control for Womenconseiller cette page à un ami

Créé et hebergé par Capit


Permanent Birth Control for Women
contraception,mst,prévention